Welcome to the Funkhaus

 

Berlin is a city chock-full of surprises. Hidden gems are in abundance in this thriving, artistic paradise. You could be sitting outside a restaurant eating a meal, meanwhile, around the corner there’s a club full of people, socializing and dancing around the clock.  It’s also no surprise that if you take a tram to what might seem like the middle of nowhere, you’ll end up at a unique space that stands out above the rest - Funkhaus Berlin. Suddenly, you’re not in the middle of nowhere, because this hidden gem is worth the trip.

Set in a world of its own, looking over the Spree at Plänterwald, this building is a great resource for anyone interested in Berlin history and architecture.  Funkhaus was built in 1951 by famous Bauhaus architect Franz Ehrlich. Funk, meaning ‘Radio’ in German, is a former GDR Institution. The space was once the largest radio broadcasting site in the the world. 

Now used by musicians, sound designers, producers, film directors, performance artists and hosts some of the best live shows in Berlin. Just last fall Michelberger Music hosted a music festival, performing in various rooms throughout the building.

(Above: Michelberger music: Holly Blakey and Gwilym Gold)

Funkhaus is one of the most exceptional purpose-built recording complexes in the world and is world-renowned for its unique acoustics.  With 5 separate studio rooms to choose from, each a different size with specific acoustic properties. Recording spaces range from 1000m2 concert hall - which can host a symphony orchestra - all the way down to a telephone booth.

Even the attention do detail in the sound chamber blows us away.

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If you find yourself in Berlin, or if you already happen to call this fine city your home, this unique aural and spectral experience is highly recommended. And make sure you hit up the Milchbar, located in the Funkhaus overlooking the Spree.

 
 
 
 

Interesting Fact: The STASI (soviet secret police force) installed hundreds of intricate wire taps behind every clock in the building to monitor Funkhaus activities.

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Photo Credits: Funkhaus Berlin Website

Published: 02/06/2017